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The Future of

Oil-Well Lift

Technology is Here.

THE PAST
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Edwin L. Drake traveled to Titusville, Pennsylvania in 1857 as an agent of the Seneca Oil Company of Connecticut.  His mission was to find and produce crude oil in quantities that would make it commercially successful for refining into kerosene. 

 

With the help of salt well driller and blacksmith William (Uncle Billy) Smith, Drake adapted and used salt well technology to drill for oil.  On August 27, 1859, the Drake Well struck oil at 69½ feet, giving birth to an industry that has forever shaped our modern world.  

THE PRESENT

Shortly thereafter (circa 1859), massive pump jacks – also known as nodding donkeys, horse-heads and thirsty birds, as well as other colorful names – were adapted to provide artificial lift to bring oil from the well to the surface.

While this technology has served us well for over a century and a half, there are drawbacks. The "horse head" is on a timer that can start without warning.  And counterweights can weigh up to 20,000 lbs. That’s enough to crush a car. These are unattractive, dangerous, high maintenance systems.

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THE FUTURE
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Pump Jill replaces the conventional pump jack for the same or less investment and provides many additional benefits:
 

  • 100% Operational Safety - no pinch points

  • Much more environmentally friendly

  • Greatly reduced maintenance

  • Extremely easier installation

  • Ability to operate remotely

Photo Gallery

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